Tag Archives: Quatro

Review: 2015 Windsurf Boards

2015 BW High-Wind Board Test

In the Gorge, 70-80-liter boards aren’t a pipe dream. They’re a staple. So we tested some over lunch … A long lunch. One not-so-happy boss later, here’s our take on the latest quad, thruster and single-fin shapes available here at Big Winds.

Lunch Test Crew:

Matt Morrow

Matt Morrow. Click to enlarge.

Matt Morrow: 180 lbs, 19 years windsurfing, loves swell slashing upwind of Doug’s.

Mark Ames

Mark Ames. Click to enlarge.

Mark Ames: 170 lbs, 32 years of sailing, loves all windsurfing!

Eddy Patricelli

Eddy Patricelli. Click to enlarge.

Eddy Patricelli: 185 lbs, 22 years on the water, former WindSurfing mag board test editor.

Lunch Test SessionFirst impressions matter. That’s what’s at play below: results assembled from three Big Winds staffers rifling through the shop’s demo fleet of 70-80 liter boards over a lunch break that lasted (ahem) 2.5 hours. Of course, one session in 20-30 mph winds off the Hood River Waterfront Park is not a conclusive test. It’s a starting point to help you find your perfect board. More lunch test sessions are to come. Shorter ones. Till then, try these rides for yourself. Two days of board demos ($80) can be applied to a board’s purchase.

GOYA CUSTOM QUAD 78

Screen Shot 2015-05-30 at 1.56.54 PM

78 liters, 223 X 56 cm, 15.5 lbs. (w/ straps + four fins): MSRP: $2,295

Matt – Planing: It surprised me. It’s the only quad in this test and its planing performance hung in there with the fleet. Riding: Its bottom shape has so much vee I expected a radical ride. Instead, it was easy to sail. It tracked well and was exceptionally behaved. Not the fastest of the bunch, but fast enough. Turning: This board shined in the turns, begged to be spun around and to be put on a true wave. Best Suits: Advanced riders under 190 lbs. who want an amazing wave board that’s also suitable for freestyle in high winds.

Eddy – Planing: Not the earliest to plane. Not far off the others, but my 185 pounds felt wind lulls a bit more on this board. Riding: It’s friendly and controlled over chop. Fast too, thanks to its forgiving ride, which inspired me to keep the pedal down. If anything, I’m anxious to try the Goya Custom Quad’s larger sibling, the 84-liter model. My hunch is this quad can be ridden a size up when matched with heavier sailors. Turning: On edge, it had no rivals. Hands-down winner for swell riding and carving fun. Best Suits: Intermediate to experts looking for a fun ride that prioritizes maneuverability; anyone headed for Punta San Carlos.

JP FREESTYLE WAVE 77 (PRO EDITION)

Screen Shot 2015-05-30 at 1.47.59 PM

77 liters (93 pictured) 228 X 56 cm, 14.25 lbs. (w/ straps + thrusters) MSRP: $2,455

Matt – I’ll break form and cut to the chase: This was my favorite board. It planed quickly, was fast and lively, yet it stuck to the water when I wanted it to. In short, the board made me feel like a hero. I planed out of my turns, jumped higher than I thought I would, and was lightning fast on a reach. I did notice the carbon construction’s stiffness in the chop, but the board was just so much fun to sail otherwise that I could not wipe the smile off my face. I would recommend this board to anyone that wants to put it in my car and get me on it again.

Eddy – Planing: It would’ve taken the top spot in planing performance if not for the Starboard Kode Freewave 81, which has a slight size advantage. Regardless, this JP had me hustling for the foot straps for the right reasons. Riding: The thruster fin setup offered what felt like all-wheel drive underfoot. On this board (and the Naish Global S) I never spun out, nor topped out — great for jumping. Turning: Good in the corners, but not quite as agile as the Goya Custom Quad or Quatro Mono, perhaps because it felt like I was entering turns with exception speed. Best Suits: Virtually everyone, with the exception of novice high-wind sailors. This model’s Pro Edition carbon construction favors experience.

NAISH GLOBAL SMALL

Screen Shot 2015-05-30 at 2.12.53 PM

78 liters, 222 cm X 57 cm, 15 lbs. (w/ straps + 3 fins) MSRP: $2,399

Matt – Planing: Super quick to plane. It’s a board that will get you on the water when most are stuck on the beach. Riding: Through the chop I noticed the extra tail width — it wasn’t the smoothest ride — but it would be a dream board for the light-medium size sailor on a wave at the coast. Turning: The unique tail shape allowed tight snappy turns. Best Suits: Beginner to advanced wave sailors tackling onshore conditions.

Eddy – Planing: This Naish rivaled the JP Freestyle Wave 78 and the Starboard Kode Freewave 81 in early planing, but it bettered them in its ability to hold a plane in the turns and through the lulls — an ideal attribute for back-foot-heavy sailors and real-world wave conditions. Riding: Tame, controlled for me, and plenty fast. Turning: It didn’t turn as tightly as the Goya Custom Quad or Quatro Mono Single, but it did carry speed on edge better than any board I can recall … ever. Best Suits: Those seeking one board for both bump-and-jump and wave sailing. East Coasters who want a powerful board for the imperfect conditions they face.

Screen Shot 2015-05-30 at 5.26.04 PM

78 liters, 240 X 55.8 cm, 15 lbs. (w/ straps & fin), MSRP: $1,995

QUATRO MONO SINGLE 78

MattPlaning: This single-fin model shot onto a plane (and shot upwind with speed ) like no other in the test. Riding: I felt dialed in instantly, and its straight-line performance was so good I began to worry it wouldn’t turn well. Turning: As soon as I put it on its rail the Mono responded. Not with a skatey type of turn. The Mono required me to commit, and get forward to utilize the whole rail. So much fun in swells. Best suits: Gorge sailors looking for a classic single-fin shape to blast around on, tear swells apart and fly past their friends.

Mark – Planing: It’s longer and narrower than others, but it planes just as quickly. Riding: Step on and go. This “modern classic” felt settled motoring through the rough stuff. Comfortable footstraps and pads soaked up the bumps. It has great straight line tracking stability, and feels engaged — eager for rider input. Did I mention it also jumps like a rocket? Turning: It’s a blast! Drawn out jibes are a dream, and snappy, rail-to-rail quickness is there as well. After riding multi-fin wave boards for the last 2 years, the Mono felt like reuniting with an old best friend. Best Suits: Experienced sailors who want a lively, fast, more traditional feeling wave/bump board.

Eddy – Planing: I expected this single-fin board to plane earlier than the fleet. And while it was near the top, I still gave a slight planing edge to its JP and Starboard rivals. Riding: There’s comfort in things you know. This old-school shape (longer, narrower) had that favorite-pair-of-jeans quality. Easiest of the fleet to sheet in and go. Turning: Against modern shapes, it surpassed all but the Goya Custom in carving prowess on my scorecard. Not bad for a “classic”. Best Suits: Sailors looking to keep it simple. A proven shape, a single fin — why complicate what works?

QUATRO SPHERE 75

Screen Shot 2015-05-30 at 3.46.53 PM

75 liters, 227 X 55.2 cm, 15 lbs. (w/ straps & three fins), MSRP: $2,335

Matt – Planing: It popped up onto a plane, and somehow felt like the whole board was up out of the water — almost like a hydrofoil. Riding: Control on the Sphere was unsurpassed. Its unique planing sensation translated into an extremely smooth ride. I was challenging mother nature to bring on the gusts. Turning: Turns were easy. The thruster fin setup handled tremendous amounts of pressure with no spinouts. Best Suits: This is a great board for intermediate sailors looking for fun and control, or advanced sailors looking to transition to a thruster from a single-fin background. I felt like this board was made for Gorge riding.

Mark – Planing: It’s a high-energy ride that’s quick to plane. Riding: This board really balances the characteristics of a single fin and multi-fin boards alike. Early planing and fast, but super quick rail to rail, with loads of grip in the turns. Best Suits: It’s a great choice for those who sail both coastal and inland locations, and seek a powerful, ultra-responsive wave board. 75-115 liter models offer a size for every sailor and condition.

Screen Shot 2015-05-30 at 3.59.06 PM

81 liters, 231 X 57.5 cm, 16 lbs. (w/ straps + 3 fins) MSRP: $1,999

STARBOARD KODE FREEWAVE 81 (TECHNORA)

Matt – Planing: It offers a lively, engaging ride, and it was easy to get planing. Riding: I was impressed by it’s smooth and controlled ride, probably due to the comfiest foot straps and pads that I’ve ever slipped my feet into. I did, however, have a few spinouts, but I sail with a lot of back foot pressure. Turning: For me, this was the easiest board to jibe of the test. It also carried speed through turns like no other. Best Suits: It’s a perfect high-wind board for an intermediate sailor to master their jibes or advanced sailors looking for a smooth riding bump and jump board.

Mark – Planing: The Kode Freewaves have a reputation for early planing. No exception here. This board jumped up to speed. Riding: The combination of a nicely domed deck, and the most most comfortable foot straps and deck pads I’ve ever used provided a very connected feel. The board was incredibly stable through chop. Very confidence inspiring. Turning: One of the easiest jibing boards I’ve sailed in a while. Carries speed through carves as if on autopilot, while the thruster fin setup offers a loose, playful feel. Best Suits: It’s such a comfortable, rewarding board to sail, it’ll deliver for a wide range of sailors.

Eddy – Planing: This board planed the earliest of all of ‘em for me. So early, I had to check that it was the Technora (read: not carbon) model. Riding: The low-profile nose provided a controlled, nose-down ride that kept me on the gas in the gusts. Also, the word “range” haunted my session on this board. It planed early, was the biggest board in this fleet, and somehow felt the most well-behaved when I was overpowered. That’s a big claim. Turning: Solid performance here too. Best Suits: Anyone who wants a board with an unrivaled wind range and an exceptionally smooth ride; one-board quiver seekers.

Goya Boards
Click to go to bigwinds.com

 

 

 

Big Winds

207 Front Street

Hood River, OR 97031

888-509-4210

www.bigwinds.com

2015 Quatro Sphere 80

Within half a reach I knew the Quatro crew had a great board with the Sphere 80. After a couple of reaches I was in love. Having never ridden a thruster set-up before, I wasn’t sure if the Sphere 80 would be something I would really like. Normally I like “fast” waveboards and I was expecting the thruster fin set up to feel a little slow for my taste. This was not the case at all. For a wave board, the Sphere had plenty of top end and it carried speed very well in the turns. Keith Taboul, Quatro’s shaper apparently designed it this way: “I stuck to a v-bottom for early planing and a double concave to soften the ride at high speeds and then worked meticulously on the rail foiling, ending up having the rails faster from nose to tail to making the board feel distinctly crisp and responsive.”

quatro3

The thruster set-up was noticeable when slashing a swell in that it was both loose and tracked exceptionally well; the board went exactly where I wanted it to, exactly when I wanted it to. I was powered on a 4.2 and in the gusts I was amazed and how in control I felt on the Sphere. It stuck to the water very well yet was easy to release when jumping. I was warned that sometimes thruster/quad set-ups can spin out easier due to the smaller fins and foot pressure adjustment is necessary for those with heavy rear pressure, but not with the Sphere. I felt like I could handle any gust, any bump and any swell. Due to how in control I felt on the Sphere, I went for maneuvers I might not normally try. It made me a better sailor, which makes windsurfing so much more fun.Quatro Sphere at Big Winds

I would highly recommend this board to anyone coming from a single fin background who might be hesitant to use a thruster setup. There is just no downside that I could find, the Sphere was fast, loose and easy to sail. I felt more in control on the Sphere than on any board in that size that I can remember. It felt like it was made for the chop and swell of the Gorge, I can’t wait to try it on an ocean wave.

–Matt Morrow

Click to go to bigwinds.com

 

 

 

Big Winds

207 Front Street

Hood River, OR 97031

888-509-4210

www.bigwinds.com

Fiona Wylde: 2014 Overall Surftech Shootout Women’s Champion

Big Winds team rider Fiona Wylde brought us up-to-date on her latest exploits:

It Wasn’t A Win Without A Fight

Every contest has a different aspect; a different way of achieving an outcome; a different way of ending a contest. Sometimes I end contests earlier than I want to by not making it through a heat or placing as high in a race, but never am I going to give up and stop pushing my abilities to the highest place they can go on that day of competition.

fiona-cruz2I was invited to the Surftech Shootout back in January to surf the prestigious wave at Steamer Lane in Santa Cruz, California. My Quatro teammate, Bernd Roediger flew in from Maui to meet me and my dad who drove down from Hood River, Oregon. With the van packed with multiple surf and race boards we were ready for whatever the conditions gave us over the weekend.

As most of you know, Santa Cruz is a surfing Mecca where much of surfing innovation began. Twenty-eight years ago the Santa Cruz Kayak Fest, now Paddle Fest, was created. Over the last couple years the Paddle Fest organizers have opened up the event to include stand up paddlers, which we are extremely grateful for.

fiona-cruz4The contest began on Friday, the 28th, with preliminary stand up surfing heats. Both Bernd and I surfed smart heats, catching head high set waves at the Point and riding them through to Indicators, which granted us wins. On Saturday we raced in the six-mile elite stand up race, leaving from Cowells Beach. I had a good start and lead the women and hung with Bernd until the first buoy, which was a mile into the race. Then Morgan Hoesterey, an extremely strong, incredible paddler came up and passed me. I did my best to hang with her, but she pulled away. Windy, choppy water and beach runs made the race more fun and interesting for all the competitors. I maintained second place, finishing fifty-nine minutes after I started. Bernd finished middle of the fleet, which is really good for the guys division considering he hasn’t raced in a flat-water race in over two years.

fiona-cruz1That afternoon the south wind kicked up even more and the waves were pretty small. I was a little skeptical paddling out to my second heat that afternoon, but my mood changed as soon as the horn sounded. Fun-size waves were coming through and it was way better than I imagined. I won that heat to secure my spot in the final. Bernd did the same with his quarterfinal heat and we were both looking forward to surfing the next day.

fiona-cruz3True to the swell forecast, Sunday delivered. We arrived at The Lane to eight foot, glassy faces, and were happier than two kids in a candy shop; only the candy was the waves. Bernd got to surf his semifinal heat in the glassy conditions where he put on a clinic. By the time the women’s final came around later that afternoon, the wind had picked up a bit, but the sets were bigger! I took my 7’8″ Quatro Step-up gun, rather than my shortboard, for stability in the wind and to get into the waves easier. I was frothing! Sitting in the channel I couldn’t wait to get my heat underway. The horn sounded to end the heat before me, so I had one minute to get in position. As soon as I was at the peak where the waves had consistently been breaking, a massive set came through that peaked way outside. I started paddling frantically. I thought that maybe by the time I got to the first one the heat would be underway, but I was four seconds too early. It would have been a late drop either way, so I paddled over and was confronted with an even bigger wave. Scratching to get over it in time, I rejected that opportunity when it peaked up even more and broke on my head. I had no option but to dive as deep as I could under the wave. As soon as I dove, I felt a pull then a release… my leash had broken. As soon I popped up, I signaled and yelled for the Jet Ski. They came in, pulled me up on the sled and drove me into the break to look for my board. For those that aren’t familiar with Steamer Lane, the “beach” consists of rocks and cliff. I did not want my board to get destroyed, and I still wanted to surf this heat. We drove through Indicators, just in time to see a California State Lifeguard pop over a wave paddling my board to safety. It was like a miracle! He handed me the board and an extremely generous water safety patrol surfer from the Santa Cruz Lifeguard took his leash off of his foot and gave it to me. I was ready for action! By the time I made it back out to the peak, I only had twelve minutes left. The heats were nineteen minutes, and since this was part of a kayak competition, they counted three waves instead of the normal two. I got lucky and a good set came through and I picked one off. Four minutes later I was back at the peak, ready for another. I caught another set wave and was making my way back out when another big set came through that broke way outside. Since I didn’t have much time left and I still needed another wave, I decided to go for it. I picked the second wave of the set and took off right as it broke. I made the drop, but when the whitewater exploded, I got worked. No sets came through in the last two minutes. The horn blew, and my contest was over.

I didn’t know if my two waves and drop were enough for me to take the win. The other girls caught plenty of waves from start to finish and were shredding! What I was happy about was that given the scenario, I did the most that I could to surf my best and make and use the twelve minutes to my full potential.

Bernd’s final followed shortly after mine. Sitting on the cliff, watching him, I felt like I was watching an ASP Professional Surfer that somehow got a paddle stuck in his hand. Bernd caught four waves in his heat, but he didn’t catch just four waves, he caught the best four waves. There were no doubts in our mind, and pretty much everybody’s on the cliff, that Bernd had won and owned the final.

fiona-cruz5My worries ceased when the announcer welcomed me to the stage to congratulate me for my Sup surfing Women’s Surftech Shootout victory! And my happiness went through the roof when they announced me as the 2014 Overall Surftech Shootout Women’s Champion from my race and surf result! With Bernd winning the men’s overall sup surfing, me winning the women’s and the women’s overall Surftech Shootout, it was an all around Quatro victory!

All of this wouldn’t have been possible without the help of Jackson, the California State Lifeguard who jumped off the rocks to save my board and the water safety surfer for giving me his leash along with the Jet Ski Patrol. You guys made it possible for me to surf the rest of the heat! A big thank you goes to Duke Brower at Surftech and the Santa Cruz Paddle Fest for incorporating Stand Ups into your event. And of course thank you to Rahel, Lexi, Jessie, and Buck of the Lyons family for hosting us and making us feel at home! To all of the surfers of Santa Cruz thank you for graciously sharing your wave and allowing stand up paddlers and kayakers to surf Steamer Lane for the weekend.

This event comes to a close on a high note. With both Bernd and me winning, both on Quatro, both loving our boards and enjoying Santa Cruz, we will always remember this event with positive memories. Not all events end this way, so when they do, we need to remember them and enjoy this moment! Cheers to fun times!

~Fiona